Most Common Photo Editing Mistakes to Avoid

Most Common Photo Editing Mistakes to Avoid

When you edit your photos, you want them to still look natural, though flawless. But sometimes, it’s hard not to go overboard with the editing. Who can possibly resist when you can turn your hair color from a boring brown to a mysterious purple, or smoothen those pesky open pores on your skin for once? There are many amazing face editor apps out there that can do all this and more, but it’s your job to know when to stop! 

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As a general rule, you shouldn't try to make yourself look literally flawless. If you smoothen your skin too much, make your teeth too white or anything of the kind you’ll only make yourself look uncanny. Today, we’re going to talk about how to use the power of photo editors for good.

By the end of this read, you’ll know what not to do when it comes to photo editing!

Don’t Smoothen Your Skin Too Much

Like we said before, don’t let yourself get carried away with the temptation to make your skin look smooth and soft. The little imperfections in your skin are part of what make you look beautiful and human. Any drastic changes to your skin will only make it too obvious that you’ve been photo editing, and no one wants nasty comments like that.


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If it helps, you can keep both the original photo and the edited version side by side to make sure you don’t smoothen your skin too much.

Changing Face Shape

Who doesn’t want a smaller nose or bigger eyes and fuller lips, right? But what happens when you overdo it? Well, the results might be pretty in a weird way, but do they really look like you? Don’t slim your face so much that you lose the original shape of your jaw, or people who see you in real life stop recognizing you. From your photos.

Imagine being called a catfish even when you were using your own photos!

Too Much HDR

If you take landscape photos often, you already know how HDR can make the sky look brighter and the ground dark and rich. But what happens when you use too much HDR? The result can end up looking less like a photograph and more like a video game screenshot or an illustration.


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Too much HDR can make the shadows look too dark and lose detail, and too little can make the sky look too bright and wash out the whole landscape. There’s no set rule for how much HDR is the right amount, but be careful with it!

Too Much Contrast

The contrast setting in any photo editor can help make some colors pop, but if you use it too much the whites will appear too bright and the dark parts will be too dark. This may cause you to lose a lot of detail in your original photo.


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Once the details are gone, you’ll have a hard time getting them back in a photo. As always, keeping the original image in mind and not getting carried away in the editing is the key.

Teeth Are Too White

Some Photo editing can make your teeth look dark in a photo, so it’s okay to want to whiten them a little. But if they end up being the whitest, brightest part of the photo, we have a problem. Keep in mind that your teeth aren’t supposed to actually glitter, and go easy on the whitening!

Too Much Sharpening

If you want to make your photos looking focus, sharpening them is a great option. A common mistake, though, is to sharpen them so much that they end up messing the whole photo up. Remember, photos only look in focus when there is some depth to them, but with too much sharpening you run the risk of making your photos look too flat.

A general rule to remember when editing photos is that everything should be used in moderation, so if you’re cracking the dial up to 80% on a particular effect, maybe it’s time to go look at the original photo again.

 

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